DANIEL AVILÉS
Illustrator, Character designer and photographer. Broadcasting live from Monterrey, MX.
DANIEL AVILÉS
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sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
sepiapath:

Ulisse Aldrovandi
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tolltrollland:

Happy Earth Day!
tolltrollland:

Happy Earth Day!
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lagubeko:

sophiefranz / Sophie Franz:

maeve the duck lady.
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Art’s great nudes have gone skinny
Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.

Art’s great nudes have gone skinny
Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.

Art’s great nudes have gone skinny
Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.

Art’s great nudes have gone skinny
Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.

Art’s great nudes have gone skinny
Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.

Art’s great nudes have gone skinny
Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.

Art’s great nudes have gone skinny
Italian artist Anna Utopia Giordano has created a visual re-imagination of historic nude paintings, had the subjects conformed their bodies to what the 21st century considers an ideal of beauty. The results are revealing—and quite shocking in what they say about the modern attitude toward women’s bodies.
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kouhaai:

YESSS I found the character sheets for the dancing alien girls from the behind the scenes extra!
kouhaai:

YESSS I found the character sheets for the dancing alien girls from the behind the scenes extra!
kouhaai:

YESSS I found the character sheets for the dancing alien girls from the behind the scenes extra!
kouhaai:

YESSS I found the character sheets for the dancing alien girls from the behind the scenes extra!
kouhaai:

YESSS I found the character sheets for the dancing alien girls from the behind the scenes extra!
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enchantedsleeper:

Joan of Arc Kneeling before Angel, Henryk Siemiradzki
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mediclopedia:

Protein Crystallization (In Space!)
One of the techniques that have arose more recently (past 50 years or so) and has become a foundation in all of biochemistry and medicine is X-ray crystallography. 
This is the idea that a purified sample of protein can be first crystallized under unique conditions, then shot by x-rays to create an image which can be then translated into a structure using fourier transformation. Of course this is harder than it sounds and can take up to years to figure out. I am currently taking a course where my professor is an excellent (and one of the first) biochemical crystallographers. There was the original discovery of the hemoglobin tetramer, which took decades to figure out, but with recent technological advancements, most crystals take only a few years to analyze. 
The above pictures show the beauty of these crystals… isn’t it surreal that such beauty can be found in proteins in our bodies? One of the most challenging parts of this process is figuring out the conditions in which the protein crystallizes. There are many things that can affect it, including temperature, pH levels, ionic strengths… and in addition the formation of the crystal can take up to months or even years in a given environment. 
Researchers working on Huntington’s diseases at Caltech found a new variable in this search for crystallization. They believe their protein will form crystals under zero-gravity situations and have partnered with SPACEX to send in samples of their protein into space this past weekend in hopes that they will be able to crystallize their protein for further analysis. 
While we wait for the results… enjoy the beauty of the crystals (from various sources) above!
mediclopedia:

Protein Crystallization (In Space!)
One of the techniques that have arose more recently (past 50 years or so) and has become a foundation in all of biochemistry and medicine is X-ray crystallography. 
This is the idea that a purified sample of protein can be first crystallized under unique conditions, then shot by x-rays to create an image which can be then translated into a structure using fourier transformation. Of course this is harder than it sounds and can take up to years to figure out. I am currently taking a course where my professor is an excellent (and one of the first) biochemical crystallographers. There was the original discovery of the hemoglobin tetramer, which took decades to figure out, but with recent technological advancements, most crystals take only a few years to analyze. 
The above pictures show the beauty of these crystals… isn’t it surreal that such beauty can be found in proteins in our bodies? One of the most challenging parts of this process is figuring out the conditions in which the protein crystallizes. There are many things that can affect it, including temperature, pH levels, ionic strengths… and in addition the formation of the crystal can take up to months or even years in a given environment. 
Researchers working on Huntington’s diseases at Caltech found a new variable in this search for crystallization. They believe their protein will form crystals under zero-gravity situations and have partnered with SPACEX to send in samples of their protein into space this past weekend in hopes that they will be able to crystallize their protein for further analysis. 
While we wait for the results… enjoy the beauty of the crystals (from various sources) above!
mediclopedia:

Protein Crystallization (In Space!)
One of the techniques that have arose more recently (past 50 years or so) and has become a foundation in all of biochemistry and medicine is X-ray crystallography. 
This is the idea that a purified sample of protein can be first crystallized under unique conditions, then shot by x-rays to create an image which can be then translated into a structure using fourier transformation. Of course this is harder than it sounds and can take up to years to figure out. I am currently taking a course where my professor is an excellent (and one of the first) biochemical crystallographers. There was the original discovery of the hemoglobin tetramer, which took decades to figure out, but with recent technological advancements, most crystals take only a few years to analyze. 
The above pictures show the beauty of these crystals… isn’t it surreal that such beauty can be found in proteins in our bodies? One of the most challenging parts of this process is figuring out the conditions in which the protein crystallizes. There are many things that can affect it, including temperature, pH levels, ionic strengths… and in addition the formation of the crystal can take up to months or even years in a given environment. 
Researchers working on Huntington’s diseases at Caltech found a new variable in this search for crystallization. They believe their protein will form crystals under zero-gravity situations and have partnered with SPACEX to send in samples of their protein into space this past weekend in hopes that they will be able to crystallize their protein for further analysis. 
While we wait for the results… enjoy the beauty of the crystals (from various sources) above!
mediclopedia:

Protein Crystallization (In Space!)
One of the techniques that have arose more recently (past 50 years or so) and has become a foundation in all of biochemistry and medicine is X-ray crystallography. 
This is the idea that a purified sample of protein can be first crystallized under unique conditions, then shot by x-rays to create an image which can be then translated into a structure using fourier transformation. Of course this is harder than it sounds and can take up to years to figure out. I am currently taking a course where my professor is an excellent (and one of the first) biochemical crystallographers. There was the original discovery of the hemoglobin tetramer, which took decades to figure out, but with recent technological advancements, most crystals take only a few years to analyze. 
The above pictures show the beauty of these crystals… isn’t it surreal that such beauty can be found in proteins in our bodies? One of the most challenging parts of this process is figuring out the conditions in which the protein crystallizes. There are many things that can affect it, including temperature, pH levels, ionic strengths… and in addition the formation of the crystal can take up to months or even years in a given environment. 
Researchers working on Huntington’s diseases at Caltech found a new variable in this search for crystallization. They believe their protein will form crystals under zero-gravity situations and have partnered with SPACEX to send in samples of their protein into space this past weekend in hopes that they will be able to crystallize their protein for further analysis. 
While we wait for the results… enjoy the beauty of the crystals (from various sources) above!
mediclopedia:

Protein Crystallization (In Space!)
One of the techniques that have arose more recently (past 50 years or so) and has become a foundation in all of biochemistry and medicine is X-ray crystallography. 
This is the idea that a purified sample of protein can be first crystallized under unique conditions, then shot by x-rays to create an image which can be then translated into a structure using fourier transformation. Of course this is harder than it sounds and can take up to years to figure out. I am currently taking a course where my professor is an excellent (and one of the first) biochemical crystallographers. There was the original discovery of the hemoglobin tetramer, which took decades to figure out, but with recent technological advancements, most crystals take only a few years to analyze. 
The above pictures show the beauty of these crystals… isn’t it surreal that such beauty can be found in proteins in our bodies? One of the most challenging parts of this process is figuring out the conditions in which the protein crystallizes. There are many things that can affect it, including temperature, pH levels, ionic strengths… and in addition the formation of the crystal can take up to months or even years in a given environment. 
Researchers working on Huntington’s diseases at Caltech found a new variable in this search for crystallization. They believe their protein will form crystals under zero-gravity situations and have partnered with SPACEX to send in samples of their protein into space this past weekend in hopes that they will be able to crystallize their protein for further analysis. 
While we wait for the results… enjoy the beauty of the crystals (from various sources) above!
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breebird33:

poopinthespeedforce:

this is the species that invented space flight

#Arthur Shappey uses Google
YES especially the first one
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revereche:

mantisbutts:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893
Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

At first I thought this was some “fashion of witches and wizards through the ages” type thing but nah everyone is supposed to dress like this. I wish everyone dressed like this. 

nailed it
revereche:

mantisbutts:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893
Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

At first I thought this was some “fashion of witches and wizards through the ages” type thing but nah everyone is supposed to dress like this. I wish everyone dressed like this. 

nailed it
revereche:

mantisbutts:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893
Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

At first I thought this was some “fashion of witches and wizards through the ages” type thing but nah everyone is supposed to dress like this. I wish everyone dressed like this. 

nailed it
revereche:

mantisbutts:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893
Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

At first I thought this was some “fashion of witches and wizards through the ages” type thing but nah everyone is supposed to dress like this. I wish everyone dressed like this. 

nailed it
revereche:

mantisbutts:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893
Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

At first I thought this was some “fashion of witches and wizards through the ages” type thing but nah everyone is supposed to dress like this. I wish everyone dressed like this. 

nailed it
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laughingsquid:

Ads Libitum, A Seres of Vintage Ads Reimagined with Modern Pop Culture Celebrities and Song Lyrics
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awkwardsituationist:

"an objective observer, from mars lets say, looking at the human species would conclude that they’re an evolutionary error, that they are designed in such a way that leads them to destroy themselves and probably much else with them." — noam chomsky
though you may find that slightly macabre, we do seem to prefer our own extinction to the loss of our jobs. happy earth day, everyone.
awkwardsituationist:

"an objective observer, from mars lets say, looking at the human species would conclude that they’re an evolutionary error, that they are designed in such a way that leads them to destroy themselves and probably much else with them." — noam chomsky
though you may find that slightly macabre, we do seem to prefer our own extinction to the loss of our jobs. happy earth day, everyone.
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flavorpill:


If 1991 was the year punk broke, 1994 was the year it went for a little nap. While the originators of punk were losing interest, a legion of inferior second-wave grunge bands invaded the charts (hey there, Gavin Rossdale and Scott Weiland! Hiya, Collective Soul!). Just like virtually every counterculture movement, grunge was over as a creative force by the time it went mainstream. 

Don’t Believe the Nostalgia Machine: 1994 Was a Shitty Year for Music
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mymovieyourmovie:

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)
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memexico:

Gabriel García Márquez, uno de los mas grandes mexicanos.